From the February 2018 Issue

Crunch on Cruciferous Vegetables

All veggies are good for you, but cruciferous vegetables are in a special category. This group of vegetables is rich in disease-preventing nutrients, including vitamins C, E and K; folate, minerals, and several carotenoids, including beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin. Broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts are well-known examples of cruciferous vegetables.


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The Truth About IV Nutrition Infusions and Soylent

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Sweet On Stevia

Stevia has taken the sweetener world by storm. The use of this non-nutritive, zero-calorie sweetener is on the rise, as people continue to look for more plant-based food products prepared with minimally processed ingredients.

Simply Sub-Lime!

Tiny as they are, limes play it large when it comes to culinary prowess and versatility around the globe. Just think of Thai coconut-lime stir-fry, Mexican ceviche, and American key lime pie. This smallest of the citrus fruits is native to Southeast Asia and is thought to have come via Christopher Columbus to the New World. Centuries later, limes were used by British sailors to prevent scurvy on long voyages, earning them the moniker “limey.”

Poor Diet Increases Risk of Mortality

Diets low in whole grains, fruit, nuts, and seeds and high in salt are linked to one in five deaths globally, researchers found.

Diet Review: The Whole30 Diet

The Whole30 Diet seems to be even more popular today than when it was created back in 2009 by Melissa and Dallas Hartwig. Since that time, six diet and cook books have been published, and an extensive website launched offering information about the plan.

Snacking Isn’t Always the Answer

We’re a snacking nation. According to a Mintel survey, nearly all Americans (94 percent) snack at least once a day, and about half of adults snack two to three times per day. Many people think snacking is a healthy way to power up their day, and it certainly can be. If a small, healthful snack—say a handful of nuts or a piece of fruit—keeps you from overeating or splurging on the donut tray at work, then it’s a good thing.

Turn to Dark Chocolate for a Heart-Healthy Treat

The mighty Mayans touted it as the “Food of the Gods,” and ever since millions of palates have been held hostage to the seductive, silky ways of chocolate. Beyond its feel-good factor, partly in thanks to a mix of naturally-occurring stimulants, including caffeine and theobromine, modern research has wonderful news for chocoholics—this not-so-guilty pleasure may have some health benefits.

Bowls of Joy

One-pot meals are so easy to prepare for a quick dinner—a bit of protein, some veggies, a grain, and a sauce. Restaurants have been jumping onto the all-in-one bandwagon too, with popular “bowl” meals. Many quick-service and sit-down restaurants have a variety of bowl choices on their menus.

The Pros and Cons of Juicing for Health

Juicing is often associated with “detoxing” or “cleansing,” whether for weight loss or wellness. According to the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, fruits and vegetables are associated with a reduced risk of many chronic diseases, including heart disease and certain types of cancers. However, few Americans meet the daily recommended fruit and vegetable intake. Is juice a good way to improve intake?

Personalized Nutrition, Starring You

Traditional nutrition recommendations are generalized to apply to entire populations. Personalized nutrition is the process of designing a dietary pattern that meets your individual needs. This emerging field has the potential to revolutionize the way we use nutrition to promote health and prevent disease.

Research Roundup: February 2018

Eating salad with added fat from soybean oil promotes the absorption of micronutrients, including vitamins E, A, and K, beta carotene, lutein, and lycopene. Study participants ate salads with varying amounts of soybean oil, a common ingredient in salad dressings, then had their blood tested to measure nutrient absorption. Optimal absorption was at 32 grams (just over two tablespoons) of oil.

Download the Full February 2018 Issue PDF

The mighty Mayans touted it as the “Food of the Gods,” and ever since millions of palates have been held hostage to the seductive, silky ways of chocolate. Beyond its feel-good factor, partly in thanks to a mix of naturally-occurring stimulants, including caffeine and theobromine, modern research has wonderful news for chocoholics—this not-so-guilty pleasure may have some health benefits.

About EN

Environmental Nutrition is the award-winning, independent newsletter (no sponsors, no advertisers) that opens your eyes to what you put in your mouth. Are you floundering in the swamp of conflicting advice on low-carb diets, vitamin E, eating fish, genetically modified foods? EN offers authoritative, reliable, practical guidance on what works and what doesn't in balancing your diet to protect... More.

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