From the April 2017 Issue

Relief from Migraines with Diet

If you’ve ever experienced a migraine, there’s no doubting what it is. The pain can be excruciating and debilitating. Once the pain is gone, many sufferers are saddled with a “migraine hangover,” in which they feel drained. Migraines are distinguished by moderate to severe pulsating pain, usually on one side of the head. Sufferers may experience nausea, vomiting, visual disturbances, and sensitivity to light, sound, and even touch.


Current Issue

Anti-Inflammatory Eating for Health

The concept of anti-inflammatory eating for better health is not new, yet seems to grow ever more popular, as evidenced by the plethora of anti-inflammation diet books on the market. But what exactly is anti-inflammatory eating, and why is it important for your health?

The Buzz on Smoothies

Ideally, smoothies make a perfect meal to start your day or fuel your afternoon snack. Fruit and veggies blended with yogurt or milk is a great way to boost your vitamin, mineral, fiber, antioxidant, and protein intake, right? Sadly, not all smoothies from restaurants are healthful; many are loaded with ice cream and sweeteners, with minimal nutritious ingredients, such as yogurt, fruits, and vegetables.

Say “Yes” to Processed Fruits and Vegetables

The USDA recommends adults aim for up to 3 cups of vegetables and 2 cups of fruits every day, but most of us aren’t eating even half that amount. To increase intake, experts recommend we not only seek out the freshest produce, but also stock our freezers and pantries with frozen, canned and dried options. “We find that consumers who purchase all forms of fruits and vegetables are the ones more likely to be eating higher amounts of these healthful foods overall,” says Elizabeth Pivonka, PhD, RD, President and CEO of the Produce for Better Health Foundation.

12 Tips for Eating Green

April is a month where we celebrate all things green: From the first buds on trees to Earth Day (on April 22), it’s the perfect time to put Mother Nature back into our thoughts and actions. And one of the most important ways you can flex your green muscle is by making a few simple changes in your diet. Use these eat-eco ideas to boost the planet’s health, while staying well-fed.

Falling for Japanese Fermented Foods

The origin of fermenting foods in Japan can be traced to China, circa 300 B.C., with the making of koji, a mash of grains fermented with Aspergillus oryzae, which is used to ferment other foods. The early Chinese recipe was brought to Japan by a Zen priest, who added soy. The practice was further refined by the wife of a Japanese warrior, who opened the first commercial shoyu (soy sauce) brewery. Shoyu is brewed from equal parts of soy and wheat, and lends a savory, “meaty” flavor to foods.

Supplementing Energy

Who couldn’t use a little more energy? A number of supplements and natural remedies promise to lift fatigue and boost energy, but before you heed their siren call—and open your wallet—here’s what you need to know.

Ask the EN Experts: April 2017

If it seems to you that attitudes about diet have shifted over the past year, your suspicions are correct. According to the International Food Information Council Foundation’s 2016 Food and Health Survey, which included 1,003 American adults, the food dialogue has gained momentum in the past year. A reported 31 percent of respondents changed their minds about dietary components. The media was a top influencer for our more negative view of refined grains, saturated fats, added sugars, and low-calorie sweeteners, and more positive view of whole grains, plant proteins, and natural sugars.

Dill-icious!

The dill pickle may be its claim to fame, but dill weed’s historical, culinary, and medicinal roles may steal the spotlight for this sprite-sized herb.

Research Roundup: April 2017

Tomatoes and other foods containing lycopene—the compound that makes fruits and vegetables pink and red—may lower the risk of prostate cancer, research shows. Yo-yo dieting or weight cycling (repeated weight loss and regain) increased the risk of death from heart disease in normal weight postmenopausal women. Probiotics (“good” bacteria) may help reduce blood sugar levels, according to research.

Saturated Fats Increase Heart Disease Risk

Consuming high amounts of saturated fats, found in red meat, dairy fat, lard, and palm oil, may raise the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), according to Harvard researchers.

Download the Full April 2017 Issue PDF

If it seems to you that attitudes about diet have shifted over the past year, your suspicions are correct. According to the International Food Information Council Foundation’s 2016 Food and Health Survey, which included 1,003 American adults, the food dialogue has gained momentum in the past year. A reported 31 percent of respondents changed their minds about dietary components. The media was a top influencer for our more negative view of refined grains, saturated fats, added sugars, and low-calorie sweeteners, and more positive view of whole grains, plant proteins, and natural sugars.

About EN

Environmental Nutrition is the award-winning, independent newsletter (no sponsors, no advertisers) that opens your eyes to what you put in your mouth. Are you floundering in the swamp of conflicting advice on low-carb diets, vitamin E, eating fish, genetically modified foods? EN offers authoritative, reliable, practical guidance on what works and what doesn't in balancing your diet to protect... More.

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