Research Roundup

April 2017 Issue




Research Roundup

Tomatoes Fight Prostate Cancer

Tomatoes and other foods containing lycopene—the compound that makes fruits and vegetables pink and red—may lower the risk of prostate cancer, research shows. The study, which analyzed data from 66 studies over more than 20 years, found that men who consumed higher amounts of lycopene had 11 percent less prostate cancer risk compared to those who consumed the least. For every 1 milligram (mg) of lycopene consumed a day, there was a 1 percent decrease in risk.

(American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) Research Conference, November 2016)

Yo-Yo Dieting May Be Risky

Yo-yo dieting or weight cycling (repeated weight loss and regain) increased the risk of death from heart disease in normal weight postmenopausal women. The study included weight histories of more than 158,000 postmenopausal women over 11 years. Those who began at normal weight and lost and regained had a 3.5 times higher risk for sudden cardiac death than those with a stable weight, and a 66 percent increased risk of dying from coronary heart disease. Weight cycling in overweight or obese women did not increase death, nor in those who gained and kept it on or those who lost and kept it off.

(American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions, November 2016)

Probiotics May Lower Blood Sugar

Probiotics (“good” bacteria) may help reduce blood sugar levels, according to research. Eighty people with high blood pressure followed the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet, or the DASH diet with probiotics. Those who consumed probiotics decreased several measures of blood sugar levels during 3 months, including an average of 10.7 percent reduction in fasting blood sugar levels compared with only 3.3 percent with diet alone.

(American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions, November 2016)