Research Roundup

December 2016 Issue




Calcium Supplements; Pomegranates; Mediterranean Diet

Calcium Supplements Safe for Heart

Calcium intake is not linked to heart attack or risk of cardiovascular disease-related events, research shows. Along with vitamin D, calcium is known to benefit osteoporosis and low bone mass, which together affect almost 60 million Americans. Still, several studies have found negative cardiovascular effects related to excessive calcium supplementation. Current research, which analyzed data from over 6,000 men and women based in different locations across the country over 10 years, found no association between daily calcium supplementation and cardiovascular incidents.

(Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases, July 2016)

Pomegranate Juice May Help Osteoarthritis

Pomegranate juice could have significant benefits in people with osteoarthritis, says a study by Iranian scientists. In the study, 38 people with knee osteoarthritis were divided into two groups: the first drank 200 milliliters (6.7 ozs.) of pomegranate juice per day, while the other had no intervention. After six weeks, the juice group had significantly lowered their overall scores and scores of stiffness and physical function. The other group’s scores increased slightly.

(Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, October 2016)

Mediterranean Diet Without Fat Restriction Still Healthy

Following a Mediterranean diet with no restriction on fat intake may reduce risk of cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke, according to a review of 56 studies. The Mediterranean diet is high in fats (30-40 percent of daily calories in fats, which are mostly monounsaturated), as well as fruit, vegetables, fish, legumes and grains, but is moderate in dairy and low in meats.

(Annals of Internal Medicine, July 2016)