September 2017

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Subscribers Only - Higher consumption of fresh fruit was associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes and reduced occurrence of complications in people with diabetes, according to University of Oxford researchers. Over seven years, of the nearly 500,000 Chinese participants, those who reported the highest consumption of fresh fruit had a 12 percent reduced risk of developing diabetes over five years compared to those who never or rarely consumed fresh fruit. In people with diabetes, higher fruit intake was linked to a lower risk of mortality, about a 17 percent reduced risk over five years, along with 13-28 percent lower risk of diabetes-related complications.

Fruit Intake Lowers Diabetes Risk and Complications

Higher consumption of fresh fruit was associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes and reduced occurrence of complications in people with diabetes, according to University of Oxford researchers. Over seven years, of the nearly 500,000 Chinese participants, those who reported the highest consumption of fresh fruit had a 12 percent reduced risk of developing diabetes over five years compared to those who never or rarely consumed fresh fruit. In people with diabetes, higher fruit intake was linked to a lower risk of mortality, about a 17 percent reduced risk over five years, along with 13-28 percent lower risk of diabetes-related complications.

The Disease-Fighting Vitamin D

Vitamin D, affectionately known as the “sunshine vitamin,” is not actually a vitamin at all. It is what’s known as a “pro-hormone”—it can be manufactured by the body and, in addition to being a critical factor for bone health, it is involved in cell growth, immune function, and fighting inflammation, just to name a few of its roles.

Organics on the Upswing

If you have organic products in your refrigerator or pantry, you are far from alone. An April 2017 Nielsen survey found that 82 percent of U.S. households have organic food in their kitchens, representing a 3.4 percent increase from the last survey in 2015. The total amount of organic food sales for 2015 was $43.3 billion, 11 percent higher than the year before, outperforming the overall food market, which grew by only 3 percent. Among organic categories, fresh beverages grew the fastest. This rise is even more significant when you look at longer-term numbers; organic food sales have grown by 72 percent since 2008. In fact, sales are growing at such a clip that farmers are having a hard time keeping up with demand. As people are increasingly interested in learning more about where their food comes from, we are seeing consumer interest in organics rise in response.

Akaline Water and Guarana Supplements

Health advocates recommend drinking water as the best way to keep our bodies hydrated. At one time, turning on the tap was the way to satisfy a thirst, but nowadays there are scores of bottled waters for sale, many promising more than just hydration. Alkaline water is one among the many that line supermarket shelves.

The Beet Goes On

Subscribers Only - People have been eating beetroot for its health properties since the Middle Ages. In modern times, however, it’s the liquid version that’s making waves. Scientific studies on beetroot juice claim the elixir can lower blood pressure, increase blood flow, and improve exercise performance. As a result, the ruby red beverage has become a favorite among athletes, but does it deliver what it promises?  Beetroot Basics. …

Understanding Binge Eating

You might have heard of eating disorders like anorexia nervosa (characterized by weight loss) and bulimia nervosa (binge eating followed by purging), but you may not be aware that binge eating is classified as another type of eating disorder, which can be serious and life threatening, though treatable.

8 Tips to Master Portion Control

From restaurants to packaged foods to home cooking, portion sizes have ballooned in past decades. Many health experts link the rise in obesity rates with our tendency towards portion distortion—a mismatch between our portion sizes and energy needs. Research by the University of Cambridge found that less availability of super-sized portions alone could reduce Americans’ caloric intake by 29 percent.

Is Cereal a Healthy Choice?

Subscribers Only - Breakfast is often called the most important meal of the day, because it’s the first opportunity to fuel your body for the day ahead after a long night’s fast. It’s also the first chance to begin meeting your daily nutrient needs. An easy-to-prepare, go-to breakfast increases the likelihood that you’ll find time to fuel your body in the morning. So, ready-to-eat breakfast cereals are an ideal option for healthy, convenient breakfasts. And food manufacturers have…

Eating for Kidney Health

Subscribers Only - Nearly one in seven American adults has chronic kidney disease (CKD), and millions more are at risk. “The incidence of CKD in the U.S. is definitely increasing,” says Michael Conrad, MD, senior member of the Center for Kidney Care in New Jersey, “and since the major risk factors for CKD—diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity—are on the rise, it looks like the CKD numbers are going to keep climbing.”

How and When to Do a Multivitamin

Subscribers Only - More than one in three Americans take a multivitamin supplement, according to the National Institutes of Health, with most multivitamin users citing improved health or prevention of chronic disease as their main reasons. However, in 2014, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said the evidence didn’t support taking—or avoiding—multivitamins.

Millet, No ‘Run of the Mill’ Grain

Subscribers Only - What is millet? It may not be in most kitchens, but the popularity of this grain is gaining traction. First cultivated about 10,000 years ago in Asia and Africa, millet became a food staple around the world. The Bible refers to it in bread making, the Romans ate it as porridge, and it was the prevalent grain in China before rice. Many cuisines include millet, such as flatbreads in India (roti and bhakri), porridge in China and Russia, and even beer in parts of Africa. Packed with nutrients, this quick-cooking grain is forging its way onto the American plate.

Research Roundup

Gluten-free diets may result in low consumption of whole grains and their beneficial nutrients for people who don’t have celiac disease, so they should not be encouraged, researchers say. People with celiac can reduce risk of heart disease by avoiding gluten, but the study of more than 110,000 men and women between 1986 and 2010 with a 26-year follow-up found no association between gluten intake and risk of coronary heart disease. The study showed that participants avoiding gluten may also be avoiding whole grains, known to have heart-healthy benefits.